Salvaged Wood Wood Store that Stores Salvaged Wood

When you first start woodworking you spend your time scrounging around for any kind of wood you can find, when people are kind enough to keep donating to you however you have to find a way to store it! I wanted to keep my wood store near to my shed and so couldn’t have anything that took up too much space. I came up with a simple design which allows air flow to drift through the wood piles. It’s not the most ideal storage seeing as its outside but its better than just laying the wood on the dirt.

1

Making grooves for the pallet wood slats.

Since I already had the shed and wanted the storage close to the shed, a simple lean to seemed like the perfect solution. I started with some old roofing batten, glued a few lengths together to make posts and then sawed and chiselled out some angled sections. These rebates would have pallet wood lengths screwed into them, acting as a barrier against the rain but also allowing air flow through the gaps.

 

4

All the slats screwed on.

Once this part was finished it was just a case of making a simple frame to attach to the side of the shed and an angled roof to help it shed water easily.

5

The frame taking shape.

In the small area below the wood storage I laid some slabs down just to stop too much moisture coming from the dirt below. I also fully cladded the back of the shelves to stop the wood hitting the less than sturdy fence behind it!

My experience in drying wood is still rather minimal but I did buy a book recently which I shall be studying soon. It has good reviews and if you want to check it out you can find it here:

Wood and How to Dry It – Fine Woodworking – Amazon

All I knew at the time of building my wood store was that it was a good idea to keep rain off the wood but also create air flow. This is why you see big piles of wood with little spacers in between each plank called “stickers”. This creates air flow between the planks to allow for more surface area to be dried.

Since I mostly store pallet wood in this area I didn’t feel the need to get too technical with it. Of course when it comes to the time of actually using the wood I have to let it acclimatise in a temperature similar to its final environment. So for example if I was making a little pallet wood box to go in a home, I would have to have the pallet wood planks sit in an environment similar to that home. So I could keep them in a warmed shed or garage for a few weeks and then make the box. This makes for minimal movement of the wood after the piece is finished.

 

6

The lean to complete with shelving.

I wanted to give myself enough space in the shelves but also lots of options for different kinds of wood. This led to me making the top section open wide. I also made the lowest shelf come a little off the ground to help air flow under it. After all the shelving was complete I concentrated on the roof. This was simply some marine ply or exterior ply from a rubbish pile and some felt leftover from the building of another shed.

 

9

The first load of wood in storage.

When it was all done I painted it with some fence paint we had left over, waited for it to dry and placed all the wood inside (except for my good stuff, that goes in the shed). It’s not the prettiest structure in the world nor it is the most ideal for drying wood but for my little shed it works. I’ve built many things from the wood stored here and I hope to build many more. It’s a salvaged wood wood store that stores salvaged wood. Say that fast three times.